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about now it's all coming down to getting out the vote. and the six-floor museum in dallas has put out an old public service announcement from president john f. kennedy, in which he is encouraging all citizens to vote. >> there is one way in which we can show how strongly we believe in our democracy, next tuesday, november 6th is election day. i hope every american will turn out and vote. >> the film was put together on october 31st, 1962. president kennedy was calling on all americans to serve their country by participating. it's a very cool piece of history, but all six elections held on november 6th were won by republicans, starting with lincoln, and reagan let's hope the 7 breaks the actor edward norto teamed rtk about them to vote. f our democracy to ensure that ultimately it is we the people that govern and not the money that governs our policies. >> he said he discovered through the project what we have all been noticing thomas jefferson said that a successful democracy depended on an informed electorate. our country's future depends on you. to help you m
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
. he spoke to supporters in dallas that year. >> wait just a minute. the first thing we want to do, we will be talking about this in a minute. the first thing we want to do is to team up together and make it work now, right? absolutely. you are not too happy, we can make some changes in 1994, right? the main thing now, time is precious. let's try to make it work. texas working together to make it work. i will be talking about that in a minute. we have worked to starting right away. our country needs all of our help. [applause] i want to thank all of you are here tonight and all the people who have come here together across the nation. starting last february, you did something that everybody said could not be done. millions of you came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you f
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
am retired, but i was a plant worker. host: where is marshalled? caller: 150 miles east of dallas. host: thank you for calling. as greta mentioned, the same-sex marriage issue passed in the state of maryland, and along with that the first openly gay member of the u.s. senate was elected in wisconsin. here is tammy baldwin. [video clip] >> i did not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. [applause] a difference in the lives of families struggling to find work and pay the bills, a difference in the lives of students worried about debt. [applause] and seniors, worried about their retirement security. [applause] a difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them and their families. [applause] a difference in the lives of entrepreneur weres -- entrepreneurs try to build a business and economic security. [applause] but in choosing me to tackle those challenges, the people of wisconsin have made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his
and san francisco is all very space and a loss vegas and phoenix and the suburbs of dallas, houston, san antonio, atlanta, charlotte and south carolina were very republican, so calling the suburban analyzing by saying the suburbs doesn't work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country and finally number six you have to rethink the way in politics. this is a $6 billion election-year status quo results i think the biggest success when it comes to money in politics and i'm not talking about the methods that the macrois karl rove sabrue de billionaires' from billions of dollars. the more effective way to pay the voters directly. there's more and more return from your investment and that would conclude by saying the supreme court of the united states is the second most important institution in the united states in aiding the economic recovery because next to the fed they have done more money, more stimulus into the economy and part of the states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california in any institution. they may even be more important i
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6